4 Big Problems Created By the Standardized Testing Craze

The Obama administration confirmed what many have been saying for years: U.S. public school students are taking too many standardized tests. This came after a two-year movement to revolt against standardized tests around the country, which is still growing among students, parents, teachers, principals, superintendents, and others. Starting in February 2015, more than a dozen…
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Few Educators Are Prepared to Teach the Common Core

Even as states first began implementing the Common Core standards, educators knew that it would take several years to fully understand the new guidelines and be able to shift instruction in the new direction. It’s no major feat bringing together parents, teachers, district leaders, policymakers, and communities to work together to make the Common Core…
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This Week: Top Headlines in Education

Betsy DeVos, current nominee for Secretary of Education, recently gave a preview of her likely answers to education’s top issues in last week’s Senate confirmation hearing. The U.S. Supreme Court turned their focus on what is considered the most significant case on special education to reach the high court in nearly three decades. Read more…
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ESSA in 2017: A Challenging Road Ahead for States and School Districts

2016 was a busy year, as the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) first got off the ground. Contrary to its predecessor, the No Child Left Behind Act (NCLB) from the Bush era, ESSA was an unprecedented step forward in reforming public education, handing over control over education standards to the states. The new law focuses…
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National Scorecard Ranks 50 States on Education Performance

For more than a decade, American public education has been faced with this fundamental issue: providing the best quality education and proving their accountability in doing so. Last year, the passage of the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA) was a breakthrough in prescribing a well-rounded approach in education reform. With the rules put in place,…
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This Week: Top Headlines in Education

Last week, Education Week dropped their longest-running annual report, which grades states on the quality of their education, and revealed a C grade for the nation and called out five of the lowest-performing states which include Oklahoma, New Mexico, and Mississippi. We’ll take a closer look at some of the national and state findings in tomorrow’s…
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The 3 Big Changes That Students Want in Higher Education

As they look to the future, college leaders have to take in a variety of perspectives. What big changes should they be making over the next few years? All over the college campus, everyone has different priorities. Faculty need more resources for their department, CIOs are focused on supporting BYOD on campus, presidents want to improve…
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A Closer Look Inside the Growing College Readiness Problem

High school graduations have been at an all-time high, a major feat to be certain, but recent research is showing that many of these graduates aren’t prepared for the academic road ahead. The facts on college readiness are startling. The Nation’s Report Card (or NAEP) found that only a third of U.S. high school seniors…
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This Week: Top Headlines in Education

Educators are wondering what to expect in 2017 – innovative technology trends, federal funding and policy changes, and making progress toward gender equity – especially as the next administration may bring a wave of changes that will impact K-12 and higher ed classrooms. A new study from the University of Chicago examines the idea of…
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Can the Value of Open Educational Resources Be Measured?

Early in February, the Department of Education announced that 14 states and 40 K-12 school districts were transitioning to the use of open-educational resources (OER) in their schools, a new model of learning with the potential to increase equity and access in education as well as repurpose funding typically spent on textbooks. It’s expected that…
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